No More Excuses!

It’s getting hot in Southern California and I’m still trying to get my 10,000 steps in per day. If I don’t step out in the morning, I have to wait until after dinner due to the high temperatures. And if I’m not careful, I’ll find myself falling back on the same excuse the majority of Baby Boomers and older adults use for not exercising: I don’t have the time!*

You can continue burning calories long after you take off those shoes!

You can “make” time for exercise!

I say “excuse” because that’s just what it is. There are ways to make exercise happen, with planning and commitment. But unfortunately, less than half the adults gets the recommended 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per week, according the the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Don’t let yourself fall into this group; your life depends on it! Here are six strategies to help you carve out precious minutes for physical activity:

1) Put it on your calendar.
You “calendar” your meetings, your manicures, your phone conferences, so why not give exercise the same consideration? Commit to a specific day and time, record the appointment in a spot you’ll see on a regular basis, and schedule reminders as needed. As a result, you’re much more likely to get to these activities.

2) Exercise with a buddy.
Plan to be active with a friend or family member. You’ll coax each other along, and neither of you will want to let the other down.

3) You don’t need a 30-minute block of time.
Good news! You can break your physical activity into 10- or 15-minute increments. So no more excuses—if you’re working, you have 10-minute breaks every day! Keep your tennies under your desk, and walk instead of sitting or eating. Then look for a few minutes in the morning or evening to eek out other mini-exercise breaks.

4) Understand that any movement is better than none.
If you can’t find time for the recommended 150 minutes per week, don’t stress. Even a few minutes of exercise each day is beneficial.

5) Remember that all movement counts.  Brisk walking, walking your dog, taking the stairs, gardening and housekeeping are categorized as physical activity, along with the more traditional types.

6) And finally, track your activity every 30 minutes during one weekday and one weekend day. Don’t make a big deal out of this—use whatever method works best for you (paper and pencil, your phone, or a computer). The idea is to locate “down time.” You’ll be surprised how often you watch TV, chat on the phone, or catch up on Facebook. These pockets of time are golden when you’re looking to get more movement in your day.

*I use the flashlight on my cell phone if I get out too late, but I do get out!

To discover other ways to find more time for exercise, give me a call!

We can discuss some practical tips and discover if any of my programs or classes are a good fit for you.
If you’d like to schedule that call with me, just CLICK THIS LINK, and let me know in the message that you would like a 1-on-1 call with me right away and I will be in touch to schedule that – oh, and leave me your phone number in there too since email is not as reliable as it used to be! Thanks.

 

How Young Do You Feel?

Just how old, or young, do you feel? As it turns out, most Americans feel younger than their actual age. And they say they’re making changes to live longer. But they’re not actually reaching the change needed, especially with the high level of awareness when it comes to healthy eating habits and physical activity.

How young do you feel, and are you making the correct choices to stay young?

How young do you feel, and are you making the correct choices to stay young?

Let’s take a look at two surveys that came out recently, and what you can take from their conclusions.

The Parade/Cleveland Clinic 100Survey
Parade (your Sunday paper insert) and the Cleveland Clinic surveyed 4,000 adult Americans earlier this year. The questions sought to find out how we feel about living to 100. Here are some of the highlights:
• 69% of Americans want to live to be 100.
• 89% expect to live at least to age 80; 55% at least to age 91.
• 72% of Americans feel younger than their age.
• 64% believe staying active is a top way to fight aging, followed by eating right, regular check-ups and getting enough sleep.
• 88% would exercise more to stay healthy and 45% would significantly change their diet.
• 64% are eating less fast food, 51% have tried cutting out sugar, 31% are eating a low-carb/high-protein diet and 19% are moving toward a vegetarian or vegan diet.
• 69% of Americans fear losing mental or physical capacities as a result of aging, followed by being a burden, running out of money or being alone.

So we fitness professionals have done a great job in educating the public about healthy aging: staying active is key to fighting aging, as is eating properly. And Americans have made (or attempted to make) positive changes in their eating habits. We want to live a long life, but fear dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, growing weak and losing our independence.

I get all that. So just how good are we really doing in making positive lifestyle changes? Let’s take a look at another study, the Sightlines Project from Stanford University. Looking at data from the past two decades, these researchers have concluded that the policies, products and personal behaviors to support living into our 80s, 90s and 100s are not yet widespread.

Here are a few highlights recently published from the Stanford study:
Positive:
• More than 80% of Americans recognize that diet and exercise are important to living long, healthy lives.
• Almost one in two Americans under age 65 is exercising regularly.
Room for improvement:
• Dietary guidelines, as inferred by the percentage of Americans eating the recommended minimum amount of fruits and vegetables per day (five or more), are not being met: only 25% of all ages eat enough of these nutritious foods.
• Only 45% of 55 – 64 year olds and 37% of 65 – 74 years olds meet or exceed the recommended weekly “dose” of exercise (at least 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity).
• The majority of Americans are sedentary for a total of five or more hours per day, up in recent years. And 50% – 59% of adults between 55 -75+ years sit too much.
• Obesity, a significant risk factor for chronic diseases such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, osteoarthritis, some cancers and chronic pain, is rising. More than one in three Americans under age 75 is obese.
• Four in 10 Americans do not get the recommended seven hours of sleep per day, increasing the risk for chronic disease and mortality.

The data is clear: you know what to do. Now look for ways to make it happen! Talk with your healthcare team, reach out to a Registered Dietitian, personal trainer or wellness coach to identify important health behaviors to change and ways to be successful in sustaining new lifestyle choices.

To discover other ways to improve your mental and physical fitness, give me a call!

We can discuss some practical tips and discover if any of my programs or classes are a good fit for you.
If you’d like to schedule that call with me, just CLICK THIS LINK, and let me know in the message that you would like a 1-on-1 call with me right away and I will be in touch to schedule that – oh, and leave me your phone number in there too since email is not as reliable as it used to be! Thanks.

What’s Your Exercise Ecstasy?

Why don’t people exercise?  By now we all know it’s good for us–our bodies and our minds.  Yet 80% of Americans, including Baby Boomers and seniors, don’t meet our physical activity recommendations.

How then, do you motivate yourself, or your loved ones, to move?  Believe me, we personal trainers have been wrestling with that question for years!

One answer: concentrate on the feeling!  How do you feel during and after exercise?  What’s the immediate reward, not the longterm health benefits?  Once you identify these positive emotions, you have a better chance of continuing with the activity.

Find your joy in physical activity!

Find your joy in physical activity!

Here are a few tips to get you in touch with your exercise ecstasy:

  1. Let’s start with stretching.  Many of my clients love this activity–they tell me “it just feels good!”  Slowly easing into a stretch while breathing deeply, especially after exercise, creates a feeling of relaxation and eases tension.  Many times I hear my clients say, “I needed that!” when they stretch after a tough day.
  2. I recently asked participants in one of my exercise classes to come up with some words describing how the activities made them feel.  One of the best descriptors I heard was “energized.”  It may sound counterintuitive–to feel more lively after exercising–but it’s common to have more get-up-and-go following physical activity.  I think we can all agree: anything that gives us more energy as we age is definitely a plus!
  3. Other words I hear often include “confident” or “accomplished.”  Again, this is especially important for older adults who can’t visualize themselves lifting weights or riding a bicycle.  Once they see they can do these activities successfully, they’re more likely to try again.
  4. Find an activity that brings you sheer joy!  In the past, for me, this was bicycle riding.  I love the feel of the wind through my air, the sun on my face, the green smells you miss while sitting in a car.  More recently, it’s been silly dancing to fun songs with my grandkids or while doing chores.  Music that moves me just brings a smile to my face.  Which activity lights up your day?
  5. Let’s face it: we’re social animals.  While some people enjoy solitary activities, many love exercising with others to share successes and create a sense of community.  So find a senior exercise class at your local YMCA, learn ballroom dancing or pick up a class schedule at your local junior college.  Opportunities abound to be part of a “team” that warms your heart!

So instead of forcing yourself to head out on that morning walk because it’ll add years to your life, focus on more immediate feelings and identify the emotions related to physical activity that bring you joy.  Then you’ll be more likely to continue exercising, and the healthful benefits (of which there are dozens) will follow!

If you need help finding your joy in movement, give me a call!

We can discuss some practical tips and discover if any of my programs or classes are a good fit for you.
If you’d like to schedule that call with me, just CLICK THIS LINK, and let me know in the message that you would like a 1-on-1 call with me right away and I will be in touch to schedule that – oh, and leave me your phone number in there too since email is not as reliable as it used to be! Thanks.

Exercise Does Not Work for Weight Loss! Can It Be?

I’ve spoken recently with two people who want to lose weight, but don’t want to focus on their food intake! “Just give me an exercise program,” they say. They truly believe they’ll burn off enough calories through physical activity alone to promote weight loss. This is a BIG myth!

Exercise alone is NOT the best way to lose weight!

Exercise alone is NOT the best way to lose weight!

And so are the following beliefs:
• I can’t lose weight at my age (baby boomers and seniors)
• It’s impossible to keep weight off (even a small amount), so what’s the point?
• I’ll just count calories and ignore the quality of my diet
• I can never find time for exercise

You want to lose weight and start exercising, but with all the hype out there, it’s just too overwhelming to figure out how to be successful.  And even if you do lose the weight, you have no idea how to put these new habits in place for the long run (yes, we’re talking about behavior changes for the rest of your life!).

Does this sound like you?
• You can’t stand the thought of being hungry while dieting–but you’ll deny yourself if it’s just for a few weeks!
• You’ve heard low-carb diets work, or is it low-fat, or high-protein?–you’re too confused to know what to eat!
• Your friend tells you high-intensity intervals are all the rage for weight loss–but you’re sure they won’t work for you because you can’t even jog for a minute!
• You don’t weigh too much more than you did 10 years ago, but your muscles gone, and so is your waist!
If you said “Yes,” then “7 Truths About Weight Loss” is for you!

I’m super excited to announce this event–which I presented as a webinar a few months ago– now live, on Monday, June 6, 2016, at 10:30 a.m. PST.

Get ready to learn from the *latest research* about food, exercise and weight control–information I can’t wait to share with you! “7 Truths About Weight Loss” addresses your questions and doubts and shows you how to be successful on your weight journey.

As a valued member of the Enduring Fitness 4U community, I’m inviting you to attend this special presentation for FREE!  I want you to have access to this valuable information–concepts and strategies you can begin to implement immediately for your own wellbeing

Click here to take advantage of this free educational session.

 

Your Body Can Work Overtime, Even When You Don’t!

How excited would you be to discover you could burn additional calories with no additional effort–especially you Baby Boomers and seniors, who are cursing your sluggish metabolism? Welcome to the world of EPOC!

What is EPOC?

Heavy resistance training with short rest intervals increases post-exercise calorie burning.

Heavy resistance training with short rest intervals increases post-exercise calorie burning.

One of the by-products of physical activity is a phenomenon called EPOC—excess post-exercise oxygen consumption. Very simply put, when we exercise, we consume more oxygen and produce energy and chemical by-products. At the same time, we increase ventilation, blood circulation, and body temperature above pre-activity levels.

As a result, our metabolism remains high for several minutes to several hours after the exercise bout, resulting in EPOC–the added calories that accompany this post-exercise increase in metabolism.

How long will the EPOC effect last?
Depending on the exercise, it can take from 15 minutes to 48 hours for the body to fully recover to a resting state.

What affects the amount of EPOC?
Exercise intensity is probably the greatest determinant of EPOC. The harder you work, the more calories you’ll burn for a greater post-exercise period.

What type of exercise causes EPOC?
For several years, experts have recognized that aerobic exercise, or cardio, leads to EPOC. Recently, researchers are showing that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and heavy resistance training with short periods of rest lead to a higher EPOC effect. And don’t forget, resistance training also promotes lean muscle mass (important to keep us strong and self-sufficient as we age).

Can I use EPOC to lose weight?
No. The numbers just don’t pan out. Remember, exercise accounts for only 20 – 30% of weight loss for most individuals, and EPOC for only 6 – 15% of that energy cost. So if your brisk walk burns 150 calories in 30 minutes, your EPOC might account for only 9 – 22 additional calories. Researchers agree that the amount of energy used during the exercise bout itself, not the aftermath, is overwhelmingly responsible the for weight maintenance benefit of physical activity.

Bottom line:
I don’t know about you, but if I can burn a few extra calories after exercise, with no additional effort, I’ll take it! I don’t care if it’s 10 calories or 100. And because I exercise consistently, over time these numbers could accumulate to keep me in the same (sized) wardrobe for years to come.

Just one more reason to engage in physical activity—most likely the best medicine you’ll ever enjoy!

Note: If you are ready to FINALLY TAKE CONTROL of your FITNESS and want to speak with me in an unbiased format, take advantage of my FREE CALL. I promise to give you a few tips and things to look at immediately plus we can discuss if any of my programs or classes are a good fit for you too.

If you’d like to schedule that call with me, just CLICK THIS LINK and fill out my CONTACT FORM and let me know in the message that you would like a 1-on-1 call with me right away and I will be in touch to schedule that – oh, and leave me your phone number in there too since email is not as reliable as it used to be! Thanks .