One Simple Change for Holiday Eating

One of the biggest complaints I hear from Baby Boomers and seniors this time of year is overeating–there’s just too many goodies available all the time!

Decrease dinner plate size to easily eat less!

Please join me for this video explaining One Simple Change you can make this week to support health and wellness–it’s an easy trick you can play on your brain to effortlessly decrease portion size.

For more ideas about staying healthy during the holidays, give me a call!

We can discuss some practical tips and discover if any of my programs or classes are a good fit for you.
If you’d like to schedule that call with me, just CLICK THIS LINK, and let me know in the message that you would like a 1-on-1 call with me right away and I will be in touch to schedule that – oh, and leave me your phone number in there too since email is not as reliable as it used to be! Thanks.

 

Surviving the Holidays–Video #1

The holiday season can be stressful with food landmines around every corner!  For example, at this time of year, we eat in celebration…. and in stress!

You too can survive the holidays!

Here’s the first in a series of weekly health tips to help you survive the holiday season.

Healthy eating during the holidays video.

For more ideas about staying healthy during the holidays, give me a call!

We can discuss some practical tips and discover if any of my programs or classes are a good fit for you.
If you’d like to schedule that call with me, just CLICK THIS LINK, and let me know in the message that you would like a 1-on-1 call with me right away and I will be in touch to schedule that – oh, and leave me your phone number in there too since email is not as reliable as it used to be! Thanks.

 

Happy Thanksgiving, Healthfully Yours!

Holiday eating can be tricky to navigate if you’re concerned about your wellness. But sticking to a healthy routine during this time can keep both your energy and “jolly” spirit up. Here are some tips and tricks to help keep Baby Boomers and seniors stay fit (re-printing this blog from last year with a few updates):

Enjoy the holidays, but choose wisely!

• Be conscientious about your eating habits the days leading to a big celebration. Downsize your serving plates, make sure you don’t skip meals and save the alcohol and desserts for the big feasting day.
• Avoid going to parties hungry to prevent overindulging. Fill up before you go by eating a small snack with protein and fiber (try celery with peanut butter or a fruit and yogurt parfait topped with walnuts) and lots of water.
• When dishing up food at the buffet table, remember these guidelines: half of your plate should be filled with vegetables and fruit, one-quarter with whole-grains and one-quarter with lean protein. Pick up small portions and eat slowly. You can always go back for more later!
• Be creative with healthful substitutions:
o In baking, use unsweetened applesauce in place of butter, decrease sugar and chocolate chips or candies by up to 50% and replace cream or whole milk with 1% or skim milk.
o In cooking, replace butter with vegetable oil (e.g., olive oil), use herbs and spices like rosemary and cloves instead of salt, substitute whole-grain breads and pastas for the white versions, replace cream or whole milk dairy products with 1% or nonfat and bake or grill instead of frying.
• Liquid calories add up quickly! Drink with care, as eggnog, punch, and sugar-based alcohol mixers are high in calories, sugar and sometimes fat.
• Watch out for rich cakes and cookies that are high in fat and sugar. Instead opt for seasonal fruits like pomegranates and clementines, crustless pumpkin pie or choose a small serving of your favorite dessert.
• Be careful with appetizers as they are often deep-fried and sodium-filled. Choose a piece of cheese with a whole-grain cracker or fresh fruit to stave off the pre-dinner munchies.
• Get out of the kitchen as much as possible! Enlist the help of a trusted guest, then go out to mingle or walk around outside for a few minutes!
• Plan in some physical activity. Find downtime during meal prep and clean-up to re-connect with friends and family while: walking the neighborhood to enjoy holiday decorations, strolling through the local parks, window shopping your favorite malls or chatting during the halftime show.
• Stop to be mindful about the holiday. Keep a trick or two up your sleeve to pull out when you’re feeling stressed (it could be taking a walk, dancing with little ones or remembering what you’re grateful for).
• Get back to your regular eating and exercise routine as soon as possible. You may miss some sleep and gain a few pounds, but take back control of your life by starting up your wellness habits as soon as the holiday dust has settled.

For more ideas about staying healthy during the holidays, give me a call!

We can discuss some practical tips and discover if any of my programs or classes are a good fit for you.
If you’d like to schedule that call with me, just CLICK THIS LINK, and let me know in the message that you would like a 1-on-1 call with me right away and I will be in touch to schedule that – oh, and leave me your phone number in there too since email is not as reliable as it used to be! Thanks.

 

And What Are You Doing at 5:30 A.M.?

I was sitting next to a business coach at a luncheon last month. The conversation turned to the topics of achieving goals and maintaining focus. Then out of the blue, the woman asked me, “Do you have a morning routine?”

A focused morning routine starts early!

The answer was a resounding “No!” In fact, I’d developed the bad habit of turning on the “snooze” button every day and staying in bed longer than I’d intended. When I got home, I started researching morning routines, and it turns out most Baby Boomers and older adults do not engage in this practice.

Set Your Morning, Set Your Day
Many experts say a morning routine will help you prepare for your day. A routine anchors you and helps you stay focused on your most important tasks. Being proactive, not reactive, can increase productivity and energy. And a morning plan helps you take care of yourself first.

Many successful people depend on their A.M. routines–Former President Obama, Steve Jobs, Tony Roberts and lots more.

Ingredients to a Morning Routine
1)  Prepare the night before. This helps decrease the number of decisions you have to make in the morning, boosting your chance of success.
-Make a commitment to rise at a specific time.
-Move your alarm away from your bed; this forces you to get up.
-Set out your clothes and anything else you’ll need the next day.

2)  Stay hydrated–drink a large glass of water upon rising.

3)  Valuable activities to do in your routine:
-Meditate or sit in silence.
-Express gratitude.
-Write goals.
-Exercise.
-Visualize your successful day.

And of course, you’ll need to get up earlier than you do now.

The lady I sat next to last month recommended I read The Miracle Morning by Hal Elrod. This book would help jumpstart my day with focus.

I’ve read the book, and I’m surprised to discover I don’t hate getting up at 5:30. This is because I used to loathe rising early–I was a terrible sleeper and I had to leave home at 6:15 for my 50-mile drive to work (ugh, how did I ever do that?).

I’m only 8 days into my new morning routine, and I’m actually enjoying it. I’ll report in from time to time with my progress.  Check out the book if you’re looking for a new way to start a morning routine and get focused.

For more ideas about boosting your motivation and health, give me a call!

We can discuss some practical tips and discover if any of my programs or classes are a good fit for you.
If you’d like to schedule that call with me, just CLICK THIS LINK, and let me know in the message that you would like a 1-on-1 call with me right away and I will be in touch to schedule that – oh, and leave me your phone number in there too since email is not as reliable as it used to be! Thanks.

Is This One of Your Greatest Fears?

If you’re like many Baby Boomers and seniors, it is!  Alzheimer’s disease–it destroys brain health, and strips us of our wellness, our memories and our ability to do simple daily tasks.

Alzheimer’s disease is one of our biggest fears associated with aging.

November is National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month. The number of people affected with Alzheimer’s is growing exponentially: fewer than 2 million Americans had Alzheimer’s 35 years ago; today the number is nearly 5.4 million and it’s expected to triple by 2050.

THIS IS YOUR BRAIN THROUGH THE YEARS
As we grow older, our brains go through natural changes that result in subtle declines in mental function: we can’t process information as quickly, we don’t “multitask” as well and parts of our memory start to decline, as does our ability to make decisions. But none of these changes affect our ability to function in everyday life.

With dementia, there is a greater deterioration in memory, thinking, behavior and the ability to perform simple activities that is not a normal part of growing older.

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. AD slowly destroys brain health, leading to personality changes and eliminating our ability to carry out the simplest tasks of daily life.

With no definitive cause (the greatest risk factor is increasing age) and no known cure, the need to find preventive strategies is critical.

Luckily, researchers are making progress by identifying conditions that often accompany AD (“co-morbidities”). These include obesity, type 2 diabetes and hypertension–chronic diseases that respond to lifestyle changes. Let’s take a look at some recent recommendations.

FOOD
Researchers at Rush University Medical Center took the best parts of other food plans associated with brain and cardiovascular health and developed the MIND diet. The plan is rich in fruits and vegetables, whole grains, healthy fats, legumes and nuts, with some lean protein sources. It is low in sugar and harmful fats, and high in anti-inflammatories and antioxidants that help protect against chronic inflammation, a condition that often accompanies aging.

The results were published in 2015: the risk of AD was lowered by as much as 53% in participants who adhered to the diet rigorously.

Here are best practices for a brain-healthy diet:
• fruits and vegetables, up to 11 servings per day
–stressing berries and green leafy vegetables
• dried beans, 3 – 4 times per week
• whole grains, at least 3 serving per day
• olive oil
• nuts
• a small amount of fish and poultry, once or twice a week
• wine, in small amounts

Limit red meats, pastries and sweets, fried or fast food, fats from meat sources

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY
With aging often comes a decrease of blood, oxygen and nutrients to the brain. We also see a drop in the number of brain cells (neurons) and the all-important connections between them (synapses), leading to brain dysfunction or dementias.

Scientists once thought we were born with a finite number of brain cells; when they died off, they were gone, along with the functions they performed. It was believed that nothing could be done to reverse this process.

But researchers now know we’re capable of rebuilding our brains through a process called “neuroplasticity.” The brain is actually capable of re-wiring its circuits, bringing back the ability to adapt to new circumstances and develop new skills.

This is where exercise comes in–hailed as one of the most promising lifestyle interventions for the prevention of Alzheimer’s. Exercise increases blood flow to the brain and helps control many of AD’s co-morbidities: diabetes, cardiovascular disease and obesity.

But most importantly, it turns out that physical activity, especially aerobic or cardiovascular exercise, promotes the production of special proteins called brain-derived neurotropic factors, or BDNF. These chemicals stimulate new connections between brain cells, generate new blood vessels and produce new brain cells; they help protect our brains from mental decline.

The bottom line for exercise to support robust brain health:
• 150 minutes of aerobic exercise weekly that is consistent and mentally challenging.
• Strength training twice a week also boosts BDNF.
• Balance and flexibility training are important in preventing falls; head injuries are a major risk factor for AD; do these activities least two days per week.

For more ideas about maintaining your health as your age, give me a call!

We can discuss some practical tips and discover if any of my programs or classes are a good fit for you.
If you’d like to schedule that call with me, just CLICK THIS LINK, and let me know in the message that you would like a 1-on-1 call with me right away and I will be in touch to schedule that – oh, and leave me your phone number in there too since email is not as reliable as it used to be! Thanks.